Dating old bottles blm

For example, the quart canning jar pictured to the right is boldly embossed on one side with PACIFIC / SAN FRANCISCO / GLASS WORK (sic) making it easily clear that the jar was manufactured by the Pacific Glass Works of San Francisco, CA. (Photo courtesy of Bill Lockhart.)The following is quoted from the introduction to the book Bottle Makers and Their Marks by Dr.

- the first successful glass company west of the Rockies - which operated under that name from 1862 to 1876 (Toulouse 1971). Julian Toulouse and is one of the better quick summaries on the subject of maker's marks pertinent to the goals of this website. Toulouse wrote his book from the perspective of assisting collector's as well as archaeologist's as implied in the following quote.): Trademarks, whether registered or not, brand names, and other marks and symbols of identification found on bottles are datum points in determining the history and ages of the collectors' bottles.

If not known and the marking is either a clearly identifiable alphabetical letter or letters (like A. This can be done by using the appropriate "Makers Markings Logo Table" to ascertain which mark/marks were used by what company.

dating old bottles blm-56dating old bottles blm-5

These new/revised articles are noted below followed by the publishing date.

Supplementary files to complete each alphabetical section - e.g., "Preface/Introduction & Table of Contents" and the pertinent "List of Factories" and "Logo Table" of actual bottle markings - will also be listed in the appropriate alphabetical section.

Bill Lindsey's fantastic bottle identification and information site.

Loaded with detailed descriptions and diagrams, and luscious high res photos, this is a superlative one-stop educational resource and vicarious digger experience.

The following link will take one to David Whitten's exceptional webpages that cover most known American glass makers marks assigning specific markings to the known (or strongly suspected) user of the marking - David Whitten is a serious avocational student of bottle and insulator makers marks and his pages are a wealth of information on the subject.

His webpage is also a great resource for those wishing to figure out what an observed makers mark stands for on a bottle they may have and an approximate date range.

One factory making beer bottles in the 1880s, whose ownership, name, and mark changed five times in eleven years, has helped historical archaeologists date a number of sites in the western United States.

(Toulouse 1971)The pictures to the left show the base of an 11 oz.

(Website author's note: "considerations" would include manufacturing based diagnostic features - a primary goal of this website - and/or local research in to the user of the bottle, if that fact is known via embossing or labeling.) If the period of use of the mark was short, the age of the bottle may be pinpointed to a short period of time.

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