Carbon dating flaw

The problem with freshwater clams arises because these organisms derive the carbon atoms which they use to build their shells from the water in their environment.If this water is in contact with significant quantities of limestone, it will contain many carbon atoms from dissolved limestone.

Even a hypothetical sample containing absolutely no radiocarbon will register counts in a radiocarbon counter because of background signals within the counter.

In the early days of radiocarbon analysis this limit was often around 20,000 radiocarbon years.

Thus, it is possible (and, given the Flood, probable) that materials which give radiocarbon dates of tens of thousands of radiocarbon years could have true ages of many fewer calendar years. The shells of live freshwater clams have been radiocarbon dated in excess of 1600 years old, clearly showing that the radiocarbon dating technique is not valid.

The shells of live freshwater clams can, and often do, give anomalous radiocarbon results.

Radiocarbon is not used to date the age of rocks or to determine the age of the earth.

Other radiometric dating methods such as potassium-argon or rubidium-strontium are used for such purposes by those who believe that the earth is billions of years old.

the Radiocarbon used as a tracer is produced artificially in nuclear reactors.

The field of radiocarbon dating has become a technical one far removed from the naive simplicity which characterized its initial introduction by Libby in the late 1940's.

However, the reason for this is understood and the problem is restricted to only a few special cases, of which freshwater clams are the best-known example.

Tags: , ,